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Protected Species Surveys

Certain species have special protection from disturbance and harm, and protection of their breeding and resting sites. The presence or potential presence of any protected species is a material consideration in planning application decisions.
 
What We Do

At Northern Insight Ecology, we offer a wide range of protected species surveys, which are designed to employ all the required survey methodologies, tailored to specific development requirements and to meet the necessities of both planning and statutory regulators.

 

We have considerable survey experience covering a wide range of protected species, including Bats, Otter, Badger, Water Vole and Breeding Birds etc. Additionally, we have successfully prepared site-specific species mitigation plans in relation to European Protected Species Mitigation (EPSM) licence applications, on behalf of clients.  
 
What Planners and Developers must do

The presence of a protected species rarely means that no development can take place. But mitigation measures are often needed, which may affect working methods and the timing of works. If there’s reasonable evidence that a protected species is present on site or may be affected by a proposal, its presence must be established. Early surveys and comprehensive mitigation plans will help to progress a development proposal that may affect a protected animal.

Proposals requiring the most careful scrutiny include those that may impact on:
  • European protected species – e.g. bats, otters and great crested newts
  • Species on Schedule 5 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) – e.g. red squirrel and water vole
  • The badger – protected under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992
You many need to apply for a licence for any activity that has the potential to disturb a protected species. This includes disturbance for the purpose of either development or survey and research.                                                (Source: Scottish Natural Heritage).